Sigsand Manuscript

ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスンとその周辺

上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。
--.--.-- --:-- | スポンサー広告 | トラックバック(-) | コメント(-) |

As soon as they were ready we sallied out: Will and I first, the others following and keeping well together. The night was not particularly dark―the snow seemed to lighten it. At the bottom of High Street one of the men gave a short gasp, and pointed ahead.

There, dimly seen, and stealing across the snow with silent strides, was a giant form draped in white. Signing to the men to keep quiet, we ran quickly forward, the snow muffling our footsteps. We neared it rapidly. Suddenly Will stumbled and fell forward on his face, one of his pistols going off with the shock.

Instantly the Thing ahead looked round, and next moment was bounding from us in great leaps. Will was on his feet in a second, and, with a muttered curse at his own clumsiness, joined in the chase again. Through the park gates it went, and we followed hard. As we got nearer, I could plainly see the black headdress, and in the right hand there was a dark something; but what struck me most was the enormous size of the thing; it was certainly quite as tall as the marble goddess.

On we went. We were within a hundred feet of it when it stopped dead and turned towards us, and never shall I forget the fear that chilled me, for there, from head to foot, perfect in every detail, stood the marble goddess. At the movement, we had brought up standing; but now I raised a pistol and fired. That seemed to break the spell, and like one man we leapt forward. As we did so, the thing circled like a flash, and resumed its flight at a speed that bade fair to leave us behind in short time.

Then the thought came to me to head it off. This I did by sending the three men round to the right-hand side of the park lake, while Will and I continued the pursuit. A minute later, the monster disappeared around a bend in the path; but this troubled me little, as I felt convinced that it would blunder right into the arms of the men, and they would turn it back, and then―ah! then this mystery and horror would be solved.

****************

 準備が整うとすぐに僕たちは出発した。ウィルと僕が先頭に、他の三人が僕たちに続いた。夜はもうそれほど暗くもなく、雪も軽く思えた。目抜き通りの突き当たりで、男たちの中の一人がハッと息を呑んで前方を指差した。
 そこには、薄暗い視界の向こうに、そっと音を立てずに雪の上を大股で歩き去って行く白い巨人の影があった。音を立てないようにと皆に呼びかけ、急いで我々は前に向かって走った。雪が僕らの足音を消してくれた。僕たちはそいつとの距離を急速に詰めていった。不意にウィルが躓いて前のめりに倒れ、その衝撃で彼の持っていたピストルのうちの一丁が暴発した。
 すぐに《そいつ》は辺りを見回し、次の瞬間、大きく跳躍して僕らから離れていった。ウィルはすぐに立ち上がり、自分の失態に悪態をつくと、再び追跡に加わった。だがそいつが公園の中に入ると、追跡は困難になった。我々が距離を詰めるにつれて、僕の目にはっきりと映ったものは、そいつの黒い頭飾りと、そして右手に持った何か黒っぽいものだった。だが僕を一番驚かせたのはそいつの巨体だった。そいつは確かに、あの大理石の女神像と同じくらい背丈だったのだ。
 僕らは追跡を続けた。そいつとの距離が百フィートを切った時、そいつはぴたりと立ち止まり、こちらを振り向いたが、あの時の凍り付くような恐怖を僕は決して忘れないだろう。そこに立っていたのは、頭の天辺から爪先まで、その細部に至るまで完璧に、あの大理石の女神そのものだったのだ。その衝撃に僕たちは呆然とした。だが、我に返って僕はピストルを構え、発砲した。それが呪文を打ち破ったかのように、僕たちは一丸となって前に突進した。それと同時に、そいつは閃光のようにサッと身を翻し、瞬時にして我々を置き去りにしてしまうほどの速さで逃走を再開した。
 見失うのではないか、という思いが僕の頭にちらついた。それで僕は三人の男たちを公園の池に沿って右方向へと向かわせて、ウィルと僕はそのまま追跡を続行した。少しして、その怪物は角を折れて小路に入り、姿を消した。だが僕はあまり心配はしていなかった。というのは、僕はそいつが不覚にも三人の男たちの手に落ちるための道を選んだのだと確信していたからだ。そして彼らが戻ってきた時、その時には……おお!その時には、全ての謎と怪奇が解き明かされるのだろう。

"The Goddess of Death"
Written by William Hope Hodgson
(ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン)
Transrated by shigeyuki



******************

これが今年最後の僕の更新になります。
今年一年、ありがとうございました。
来年からもどうかよろしくお願い致します。

shigeyuki
スポンサーサイト

A week passed. Then, one morning early, before the dawn, we were roused by a frightful scream, followed by a cry of deepest agony. It ended in a murmuring gurgle, and all was silent.
 Without hesitation, we seized pistols, and with lighted candles rushed from our rooms to the great entrance door. This we hurriedly opened. Outside, the night was very quiet. It had been snowing and the ground was covered with a sheet of white.
 For a moment we saw nothing. Then we distinguished the form of a woman lying across the steps leading up to the door. Running out, we seized her and carried her into the hall. There we recognized her as one of the waitresses of the hotel. Will turned back her collar and exposed the throat, showing a livid weal round it.
 He was very serious, and his voice trembled, though not with fear, as he spoke to me. “We must dress and follow the tracks; there is no time to waste.” He smiled gravely. “I don’t think we shall do the running away this time.”
 At this moment the landlord appeared. On seeing the girl, and hearing our story, he seemed thunderstruck with fear and amazement, and could do nothing save wring his hands helplessly. Leaving him with the body, we went to our rooms and dressed quickly; then down again into the hall, where we found a crowd of fussy womenfolk around the poor victim.
 In the taproom I heard voices, and pushing my way in, discovered several of the serving men discussing the tragedy in excited tones. As they turned at my entrance, I called to them to know who would volunteer to accompany us. At once a strongly-built young fellow stepped forward, followed, after a slight hesitation, by two older men. Then, as we had sufficient for our purpose, I told them to get heavy sticks and bring lanterns.

****************

 一週間が過ぎた。そしてある早朝、夜明け前のこと、僕たちは絹を裂くような悲鳴によって眠りから引き戻された。その後には断末魔のような叫びが続き、最後にはゴクゴクという、呟きのように喉を鳴らす音がして、それから全てが静まり返った。
 躊躇うことなく、僕たちはピストルと火の点いた蝋燭を手にして部屋から飛び出し、玄関口へ急いだ。僕たちは勢いよくドアを開いた。外は夜の静寂に包まれていた。雪が降って、地面は白い真綿に覆われていた。
 最初、僕たちの目には何も見えなかった。だがその後僕たちは、ドアに向かおうとする姿勢で、階段に覆い被さって倒れている一人の女性の姿を捉えた。外に飛び出し、僕たちは彼女を抱え上げてホールの中まで運び込んだ。そこで僕たちは、彼女がこのホテルのウェイトレスの一人であることに気が付いた。ウィルが彼女の襟を解いて喉を露出させると、そこには輪状の青黒い痣があった。
 彼は深刻な顔をして、声は震えていたが、それは恐怖のせいではなかった。彼は僕に言った。「服を着て跡を追うんだ。無駄にできる時間はない」彼は神妙に微笑んだ。「今度こそは逃げるわけには行かない」
 丁度その時、宿の主人が現れた。彼は少女を見て、それから僕たちの話を聞くと、恐怖と驚きで雷に打たれたようになってしまい、手を力なく差し出すことで精一杯だった。僕たちは彼の元に少女を残して部屋へと向かい、急いで服を着替えた。それからホールにとって返したところ、気の毒な犠牲者の周りに女性たちが騒がしく群がっているのを見つけた。
 バーの中から声がするのを聞いた僕は、ドアを押して中に入ったところ、中には数人の給仕の男たちがいて、興奮した口調でこの惨劇について討議しているのを発見した。彼らが僕が入ってきたことに気付いて振り返ったので、僕は彼らに、自分たちに合流して手助けをしてくれる人はいないだろうかと呼びかけた。すぐに鍛え上げられた若い男が前に進み出たが、それに続いて、ちょっと躊躇った後、二人のやや年配の男たちが名乗りをあげてくれた。そうして充分な人数が揃ったので、僕は彼らに重い棍棒とランタンを持ってきてくれるように言った。

"The Goddess of Death"
Written by William Hope Hodgson
(ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン)
Transrated by shigeyuki



 “Pity,” remarked Will presently, “that we know so little about this god. And the one man who might have enlightened us dead and gone―goodness knows where!”
 “Who’s that?” I queried.
 “Oh, of course. I was forgetting, you don’t know! Well, it’s the way: For some years an old Indian colonel, called Whigman, lived here. He was a queer old stick, and absolutely refused to have anything to do with anybody. In fact, with the exception of an old Hindoo serving-man, he saw no one. About nine months ago he and his servant were found brutally murdered―strangled, so the doctors said. And now comes the most surprising part of it all. In his will he had left the whole of his huge estate to the citizens of T_____worth to be used as a park.”
 “Strangled, I think you said?” and I looked at Will questioningly.
 He glanced at me a moment absently, then the light of comprehension flashed across his face. He looked startled. “Jove! You don’t mean that?”
 “I do though, old chap. The murder of these others has in every case been accomplished by strangling―their bodies, so you’ve told me, have shown that much. Then there are other things that point to my theory being the right one.”
 “What! you really think that the Colonel met his death at the same hands as---?”
 He did not finish.
 I nodded assent.
 “Well, if you are correct, what about the length of time between them and Sally Morgan’s murder―seven months, isn’t it―and not a soul hurt all that time, and now--” He threw up his arms with an expressive gesture.
 “Heaven knows!” I replied, “I don’t.”
 For some length of time we discussed the matter in all its bearings, but without arriving at any satisfactory conclusion.
 On our way back to town Will showed me a tiny piece of white marble which he had surreptitiously chipped from the statue. I examined it closely. Yes, it was marble, and somehow the certainty of that seemed to give us more confidence.
 “Marble is marble,” Will said, “and it’s ridiculous to suppose anything else.” I did not attempt to deny this.
 During the next few days we paid visits to the park, but without result. The statue remained as we had left it.

****************

 「残念だが」とウィルはやがて言った。「俺たちがこの神について知っていることはほとんどない。しかもそれを俺たちに教えてくれたであろうただ一人の男は既に死んでこの世を去ってしまった---神のみぞ知る場所にね!」
 「それは一体誰のことだ?」僕は訊いた。
 「ああ、そうだった。俺は君が知らないのを忘れていたよ!ええと、つまりこういうことだ。数年にわたって、この場所にはワイマンという年配のインド人の大佐が住んでいたんだ。彼は変わり者で、何があろうとも、誰とも一切関わろうとはしなかった。実際、年をとったヒンズー教徒の使用人を除いて、彼は誰とも会おうとさえしなかったんだ。それが、九ヶ月ほど前のこと、彼と彼の使用人が惨い殺され方をして発見された。医者の話だと、絞殺だということだった。だが最も意外だったのは、彼の意思によってその広大な地所が、例えば公園などの施設として使用するようにと、T***市の市民に残された寄贈されたということだった」
 「絞殺、と君は言ったね?」僕はウィルを訝しげにに見詰めた。
 彼は一瞬呆けたように僕を覗い見たが、僕の言わんとすることを理解すると、表情が変わった。彼は驚いたように僕を見詰めた。「なんてことだ!君はまさか?」
 「そう、その老人もきっとそうだと思うんだ。他の人々を殺した殺人鬼は常に絞殺という手段を使っていた。被害者たちの身体は、君が話してくれたように、そういう痕跡があった。それに、他にも僕の説を裏付けることがある」
 「何だって!お前は本当に大佐が同じ殺人者の手にかかって死んだと……?」
 彼の言葉は虚空に途切れた。
 僕は頷いた。
 「だけどさ、もしお前が正しいとしてだ、大佐たちが殺されてからサリー・モーガンが殺されるまでの間には---七ヶ月ほどあったが---その間には誰一人として命を奪われなかったんだ。なのに今になって……」彼は大きな身振りで腕を広げて見せた。
 「神のみぞ知る、だ!」と僕は言った。「僕には分からないよ」
 それから暫くの時間、僕たちはあらゆる方向から議論を尽くしたが、納得のゆく結論には達しなかった。
 町へ戻る途中、ウィルは僕に、彼がこっそりと石像から欠いてきた小さな白い大理石の破片を見せてくれた。僕はそれをつぶさに観察した。だが、調べれば調べるほど、それは大理石以外の何者でもないという結論にしかならなかった。
 「大理石は大理石だ」とウィルは言った。「他のものかもしれないと思う方がおかしいのさ」僕はそれを否定できなかった。
 続く数日のあいだに僕たちは公園を訪れたが、何も変化はなかった。石像は僕たちが最後に見た時そのままにそこにあった。

"The Goddess of Death"
Written by William Hope Hodgson
(ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン)
Transrated by shigeyuki



This it must be remembered, was my first sight of it, for―now that my mind was rational―I would not admit, even to myself, that what we had seen in the darkness was anything more than a masquerade, intended to lead people to the belief that it was the dead marble they saw walking.

Seen in the broad daylight, the thing looked what it was, a marble statue, intended to represent some deity. Which, I could not tell; and when I asked Will he shook his head.
 In height it might have been eight feet, or perhaps a trifle under. The face was large―as indeed was the whole figure―and in expression cruel to the last degree.
 Above his brow was a large, strangely shaped headdress, carved out of some jet-black substance. The body was carved from a single block of milk-white marble, and draped gracefully and plainly in a robe confined at the waist by a narrow black girdle. The arms drooped loosely by the sides, and in the right hand hung a twisted cloth of a similar hue to the girdle. The left was empty and half gripped.
 Will had always spoken of the statue as a god. Now, however, as my eyes ran over the various details, a doubt formed itself in my mind, and I suggested to Will that he was possibly mistaken as to the intended sex of the image.
 For a moment he looked interested; then remarked gloomily that he didn’t see it mattered much whether the thing was a man-god or a woman-god. The point was, had it the power to come off its pedestal or not?
 I looked at him reproachfully.
 “Surely you are not really going to believe that silly superstition?” I expostulated.
 He shook his head moodily. “No, but can you or anyone else explain away last night’s occurrences in any ordinary manner?”
 To this there was no satisfactory reply, so I held my tongue.

****************

 これは記憶に留めておくべきだろうが、僕がはじめてそれを見たとき---今はすっかり理性的になっているが---僕たちが闇の中で見たものが、動くはずもない大理石像が歩いているのを見たのだと町の人々に信じさせるための単なる仮装にすぎなかったとは、自分自身に対してさえ認めることが出来なかったということだ。昼間の明るい光の中で見る大理石像は、何らかの神を形どったものであるようだった。だがそれが何の神像なのかは僕には分からなかった。それでウィルに訊いてみたが、彼も首を振って見せた。
 像の高さは8フィートか、おそらくはそれよりも少し低いぐらいだった。顔は誇張されていて---実際には全身に渡ってだが---極端に残忍な表現に彩られていた。
 頭には大きな、何か真っ黒なもので作られた、奇妙な形をした被りものが載っていた。身体は一塊の乳白色の大理石から彫り出されており、腰には優美な一枚の布を纏って、それが襞になって垂れていたが、その布は細く黒いガードルで留められていた。腕は無造作に脇にあったが、右手はガードルに似た色合いの捻れた布を掴んでいて、それが手の中から垂れ下がっていた。左手には何もなく、軽く握られていた。
 ウィルは常に像のことを『神』のようだと言っていた。だがこうして、様々な細部をつぶさに観察するうちに、疑いが僕の心の中に芽生えた。それで僕はウィルに、それはもしかしたら間違いで、性をイメージしたものではないだろうかと言ってみた。
 少しの間、彼は考えているように見えた。それから神妙な顔をして、男神か女神であるかには余り注意を払っていなかったと言った。問題は、像が台座から離れることができるような力を持っているのかどうかではないのか?
 僕は非難がましく彼を見た。
 「君は本当にその馬鹿げた噂を信じているんじゃないだろうね?」僕は諌めるように言った。
 彼は不機嫌に頭を振った。「いや。だがお前は、いや誰でもいいんだが、他の普通の論法で、昨夜起こったことを完璧に説明できるというのか?」
 これには満足の行く返答も出来ず、僕は黙り込んでしまった。

"The Goddess of Death"
Written by William Hope Hodgson
(ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン)
Transrated by shigeyuki


  I went over to the weather pin-rail, and leaned up against it, watching him, while I filled my pipe. The other men, both the watch on deck and the watch below, had gone into the fo'cas'le, so that I imagined I was the only one about the maindeck. Yet, a minute later, I discovered that I was mistaken; for, as I proceeded to light up, I saw Williams, the young cockney, come out from under the lee of the house, and turn and look up at the Ordinary as he went steadily upwards. I was a little surprised, as I knew he and three of the others had a "poker fight" on, and he'd won over sixty pounds of tobacco. I believe I opened my mouth to sing out to him to know why he wasn't playing; and then, all at once, there came into my mind the memory of my first conversation with him. I remembered that he had said sails were always blowing adrift at night. I remembered the, then, unaccountable emphasis he had laid on those two words; and remembering that, I felt suddenly afraid. For, all at once, the absurdity had struck me of a sail--even a badly stowed one--blowing adrift in such fine and calm weather as we were then having. I wondered I had not seen before that there was something queer and unlikely about the affair. Sails don't blow adrift in fine weather, with the sea calm and the ship as steady as a rock. I moved away from the rail and went towards Williams. He knew something, or, at least, he guessed at something that was very much a blankness to me at that time. Up above, the boy was climbing up, to what? That was the thing that made me feel so frightened. Ought I to tell all I knew and guessed? And then, who should I tell? I should only be laughed at--I--  


   俺は風上側のピンレールへ行くと、それにもたれてパイプを詰めながらじっと上をながめた。あとの連中は当直も非直も船首楼に入っちまってたんで、メイン・デッキにいるのは俺だけだな、なんて思ってると、すぐにそいつが間違いだってわかった。火を着けようとしたところで、若いコクニーのウィリアムスが甲板室の風下側の陰から出てきたんだ。あいつは振り返って、着々と登っていくオーディナリーの姿を見上げた。ちょっと驚いたな、というのも、あいつは他の三人とポーカーをやって、六十ポンドもタバコを巻き上げたって聞いてたんでね。もうカードは止めたのかい、なんて聞こうと口を開きかけたが、すぐに、あいつと初めて話したことを思い出したんだ。夜中になると帆がいつもはためいてるんだ、なんていってたことを覚えている。そして、あいつが夜中って一言を妙に強調してたことも。そんなことを思い出したら、なんか急に寒気を感じてね。たちまち目は帆のばかげた状態に釘付けになった。たとえ縛り方が下手くそだったにせよ、あのときみたいな穏やかでいい天気に帆がはためいている。このことで前にも怪しいこととか不思議なことだとかを見なかったろうか。帆ってやつは、海が穏やかで船が岩みたいに動きもしないようなときには、そう膨らむもんじゃない。俺はピンレールを離れ、ウィリアムスの方へ近寄っていった。あいつは何か知っている、少なくとも何か胸に描いている。その時の俺には見当もつかなかったようなことを。頭上では少年は登っていく、いったい何に向かって。それは俺心から震え上がらせたものだ。俺は知ってること、考えてること、みんな話してしまうべきだろうか。それなら、いったい誰に。きっともの笑いの種になるだけだろう。俺は・・・

つづく

kane


 A minute later Will said: “What a blue funk we’ve been in.” I said nothing. We were making towards the hotel. I was bewildered and wanted to get by myself to think.
 Next morning, while I was sitting dejectedly at breakfast, Will came in. We looked at one another shamefacedly. Will sat down. Presently he spoke:
 “What cowards we are!”
 I said nothing. It was too true; and the knowledge weighed on me like lead.
 “Look here!” and Will spoke sharply and sternly. “We’ve got to go through with this matter to the end, if only for our own sakes.”
 I glanced at him eagerly. His determined tone seemed to inspire me with fresh hope and courage.
 “What we’ve got to do first,” he continued, “is to give that marble god a proper overhauling, and make sure no one has been playing tricks with us―perhaps it’s possible to move it in some way.”
 I rose from the table, and went to the window. It had snowed heavily the preceding day, and the ground was covered with an even layer of white. As I looked out, a sudden idea came to me, and I turned quickly to Will.
 “The snow!” I cried. “It will show the footprints, if there are any.”
 Will stared, puzzled.
 “Round the statue,” I explained, “if we go at once.”
 He grasped my meaning, and stood up. A few minutes later we were striding out briskly for the Park. A sharp walk brought us to the place. As we came in sight, I gave a cry of astonishment. The pedestal was occupied by a figure, identical with the thing that had chased us the night before. There it stood, erect and rigid, its sightless eyes glaring into space.
 Will’s face wore a look of expectation.
 “See,” he said, “it’s back again. It cannot have managed that by itself, and we shall see by the footprints how many scoundrels there are in the affair.”
 He moved forward across the snow. I followed. Reaching the pedestal, we made a careful examination of the ground; but to our utter perplexity the snow was undisturbed. Next, we turned our attention to the figure itself, and though Will, who had seen it often before, searched carefully, he could find nothing amiss.

****************

 少し経って、ウィルが言った。「俺たちはなんて腰抜けなんだろう」僕は何も言わなかった。僕たちはホテルへの道を辿り始めた。僕は混乱していて、自分の頭の中を整理したかった。
 次の日の朝、僕が気の抜けた様子で朝食を摂っていると、ウィルが入ってきた。僕たちはお互いを、決まりが悪そうに見交わし合った。ウィルは椅子に座った。やがて彼は口を開いた。
 「俺たちは臆病者だな!」
 僕は何も言わなかった。それは本当のことだったからだ。それに、見知った事実が鉛のように僕を押しつぶそうとしていた。
 「なあ!」ウィルが鋭く張り詰めた声で言った。「俺たちはこの出来事に最後まで付き合う必要がある。自分達自身の名誉のために」
 僕は彼をじっと見詰めた。彼の毅然とした声調は、僕に新鮮な希望と勇気を与えてくれるように思えた。
 「まず最初にしなければならないことは」と彼は続けた。「それは大理石像に何か細工が施されていないか、それから、誰か俺たちをからかおうとした人間がいないかどうか、それを確かめることだが……きっとそいつには何らかの方法で石像を動かすことが出来るのだろう」
 僕は立ち上がってテーブルから離れ、窓の方へ移動した。外には前夜に降った雪が厚く積もり、大地は一面の銀世界へと変わっていた。その光景を見た時、突然一つのアイデアが閃き、僕は急いでウィルの所へ取って返した。
 「雪だ!」僕は叫んだ。「何かがいたとしたら、足跡が見つかるはずだ」
 ウィルは怪訝な顔をしてこちらを見詰めていた。
 「石像の周りだよ」と僕は説明した。「もう一度行ってみよう」
 彼は僕の言葉が何を意味しているのかを悟り、立ち上がった。数分後、僕たちは公園へ向かってせっせと大股で歩いていた。僕たちは脇目も振らずに昨夜の場所へと向かった。そこが視界に入ったとき、僕は驚きの声をあげた。台座の上は、昨夜僕たちを追いかけてきていたのと同じ石像が載っていたのだ。像は直立し、見えない眼で眩しそうに虚空を睨んでいた。
 ウィルの顔には期待の色が浮かんでいた。
 「見ろよ」と彼は言った。「元に戻っている。あれが自分で元の場所に戻れるはずはないだろう。だから足跡さえ調べれば、何人の悪党どもがこの事件に関わっているのか判るに違いないぞ」
 彼は雪の上を横切って先へ進んでいった。僕も後に続いた。台座に近付きながら、僕たちは慎重に地面を調べた。だが全く途方に暮れたことに、雪には踏み荒らされた跡はなかった。続いて、僕たちは石像そのものに注目し、ウィルがこれまでにも何度も行ってきたことではあったが、注意深く精査した。だが、怪しいところは何一つ見つけることはできなかった。
 

"The Goddess of Death"
Written by William Hope Hodgson
(ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン)
Transrated by shigeyuki



A moment afterwards the clouds cleared for an instant, and a ray of light struck down full upon us, lighting up the little circle of bushes and showing the clearing plainly. It was only a momentary gleam, but quite sufficient. There stood a pedestal great and black; but there was no statue upon it!
Will gave a quick gasp, and for a minute we stood stupidly; then we commenced to retrace our steps hurriedly. Neither of us spoke. As we moved we glanced fearfully from side to side. Nearly half the return journey was accomplished when, happening to look behind me, I saw in the dim shadows to my left the bushes part, and a huge, white carven face, crowned with black, suddenly protrude.
I gave a sharp cry and reeled backwards. Will turned. "Oh, mercy on us!" I heard him shout, and he started to run.
The Thing came out of the shadow. It looked like a giant. I stood rooted; then it came towards me, and I turned and ran. In the hands I had seen something black that looked like a twisted cloth. Will was some dozen yards ahead. Behind, silent and vast, ran that awful being.
We neared the park entrance. I looked over my shoulder. It was gaining on us rapidly. Onward we tore. A hundred yards further lay the gates; and safety in the lighted streets. Would we do it? Only fifty yards to go, and my chest seemed bursting. The distance shortened. The gates were close to.... We were through. Down the street we ran; then turned to look. It had vanished.
"Thank Heaven!" I gasped, panting heavily.

****************

 その直後、雲が切れて束の間晴れ上がり、月光がいっぱいに降り注いだ。そして低木の繁みに囲まれたその場所を、一様にはっきりと照らし出して見せた。それはほんの一瞬の輝きだったが、充分すぎるほどであった。台座は黒く大きく存在していたが、その上に像はどこにもなかった!
 ウィルの呼吸が荒くなり、僕たちは愚かにも、思わず立ち上がってしまった。それで僕たちは慌てて引き返し始めた。二人とも無言だった。移動しながら、僕たちはおどおどとあちらこちらを窺った。帰る道も半ばほどを終えた、まさにその時だった、僕は背後に何かが動くのを捉えた。僕は左手の繁みの薄暗い影の中に目をやった。するとそこから、巨大で、白くて、頭に黒い冠を被った、彫刻めいた顔がいきなり突き出された。
 僕は甲高い叫び声をあげて、後ろへよろめいた。ウィルが振り返った。「おお、助けくれ!」僕はウィルの叫び声を耳にしたが、そのまま彼は走り出していた。
 《そいつ》は影の中から現れ出た。そいつはまるで巨人のように見えた。僕は足が竦んでしまっていた。だが《そいつ》がこちらに向かって来た時、僕も踵を返して走った。僕の目には、そいつの手の中に何か捻りあげた布のように見えるものが握られているのが映った。ウィルは何ヤードも先んじていた。背後には、静かで巨大な、恐るべき存在が駆けてきていた。
 僕たちは公園の入り口に近付いた。僕は肩越しに後ろを見遣った。《そいつ》は急速に僕たちに近付いて来ていた。僕たちは前方目指して疾走した。公園のゲートは百ヤードほど先にあった。そこは安全で、光に満ちた通りなのだ。僕たちはそこに辿り着けるだろうか?たった五十ヤード進んだだけで、僕の胸は張り裂けそうに思えた。距離は縮まっている。ゲートがどんどんと近付いて。……僕たちは通り抜けた。通りに出てからも僕たちは走った。それから振り返った。《そいつ》は姿を消していた。
 「神様、ありがとう!」僕は喘いだ。そして安堵の息を吐いた。

"The Goddess of Death"
Written by William Hope Hodgson
(ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン)
Transrated by shigeyuki


Seven bells, and then one, had gone in the first watch, and our side was being roused out to relieve the Mate's. Most of the men were already out of their bunks, and sitting about on their sea-chests, getting into their togs.
Suddenly, one of the 'prentices in the other watch, put his head in through the doorway on the port side.
"The Mate wants to know," he said, "which of you chaps made fast the fore royal, last watch."
"Wot's 'e want to know that for?" inquired one of the men.
"The lee side's blowing adrift," said the 'prentice. "And he says that the chap who made it fast is to go up and see to it as soon as the watch is relieved."
"Oh! does 'e? Well 'twasn't me, any'ow," replied the man. "You'd better arsk sum of t'others."
"Ask what?" inquired Plummer, getting out of his bunk, sleepily.
The 'prentice repeated his message.
The man yawned and stretched himself.
"Let me see," he muttered, and scratched his head with one hand, while he fumbled for his trousers with the other. " 'oo made ther fore r'yal fast?" He got into his trousers, and stood up.
"Why, ther Or'nary, er course; 'oo else do yer suppose?"
"That's all I wanted to know!" said the 'prentice, and went away.
"Hi! Tom!" Stubbins sung out to the Ordinary. "Wake up, you lazy young devil. Ther Mate's just sent to hinquire who it was made the fore royal fast. It's all blowin' adrift, and he says you're to get along up as soon as eight bells goes, and make it fast again."
Tom jumped out of his bunk, and began to dress, quickly.
"Blowin' adrift!" he said. "There ain't all that much wind; and I tucked the ends of the gaskets well in under the other turns."
"P'raps one of ther gaskets is rotten, and given way," suggested Stubbins. "Anyway, you'd better hurry up, it's just on eight bells."
A minute later, eight bells went, and we trooped away aft for roll-call. As soon as the names were called over, I saw the Mate lean towards the Second and say something. Then the Second Mate sung out:
"Tom!"
"Sir!" answered Tom.
"Was it you made fast that fore royal, last watch?"
"Yes, Sir."
"How's that it's broken adrift?"
"Carn't say, Sir."
"Well, it has, and you'd better jump aloft and shove the gasket round it again. And mind you make a better job of it this time."
"i, i, Sir," said Tom, and followed the rest of us forrard. Reaching the fore rigging, he climbed into it, and began to make his way leisurely aloft. I could see him with a fair amount of distinctness, as the moon was very clear and bright, though getting old.




初夜直の時鐘が七つ鳴り、もう一回鳴った。俺たちはメイト直と交替するために起き始めていた。大方の男たちは寝棚からはい出し、三々五々衣類箱に座ってズボンに足を通していた。
 ふと、メイト直の見習いが右舷の戸口から頭をのぞかせた。
「一等航海士がきいてますよ、前の当直のときにフォア・ローヤルを縛ったのは誰だって」
「何をきいてるって」一人の男が訊ねた。
「風下側のが解けてはためいてるんです。それで、当直が交替したらすぐに上へあがって縛り直してこい、ってことなんだけど」
「へえ、あいつがそげなことを。じゃけんど、そいつは俺じゃねえな。他ん奴にきいてみな」
「何をきいてるって」プラマーが眠たそうに寝棚からはいだしてきた。
 見習いは同じことを繰り返した。
 男はあくびをして、伸び伸びと手足を伸ばした。
「よし、なんだと」と呟くと、片方の手で頭を掻き、もう一方でズボンを手探りした。「誰がフォア・ローヤルを縛ったかだと」あいつはズボンに足を通すと立ち上がった。「そりゃもちろんオーディナリーだよな。他の誰がやるってんだよ」
「こっちがききたいですよ」見習いはそういうといってしまった。
「おい、トム、起きろよ、このぐうたら坊主め」スタビンスがオーディナリーにいった。
「フォア・ローヤルを誰が縛ったかって一航士がきいてきたぜ。ひらひらはためいてるんだとよ。で、八点鐘が鳴りしだい上に登って縛り直してこいとさ」
 トムは寝棚から飛び出すと、大慌てで着替え始めた。
「帆がはためいてるって?そんなに風はねえはずだよ。それにガスケットの端は他の縄束の下にしっかり突っ込んどいたんだけどなあ」
「どっかのガスケットが腐ってて吹っ飛んじまったんだろ」とスタビンス。「どっちにしろ急いだほうがいいぜ。すぐに八点鐘だ」
 一分ほどすると八点鐘が鳴って、俺たちは点呼のために船尾に集まった。全員の名前が呼ばれるとすぐに一等航海士が二等航海士の方に身を傾けて何か話し、それから二等航海士が怒鳴った・・・
「トム!」
「サー!」トムが答えた。
「前の当直でフォア・ローヤルを片付けたのはおまえだな」
「イエス、サー!」
「それが解けてるってのはどういうことだ」
「わかりません、サー」
「まあ、いいだろう。さっさと登ってガスケットを巻き直してこい。いいか、今度はちゃんとやれよ」
 トムは「アイ、アイ、サー」と答えて、他の連中と一緒に前へ歩いていった。そしてフォア・リギングに取り付くと、ゆっくりと登りだした。月はもう欠けはじめてはいたが、とても明るかったんで、かなり登ったところでもあいつの姿ははっきりと見えてた。

つづく

kane

“What about weapons?” I asked presently. “I suppose it will be advisable to take something in that line?”
For answer Will unbuttoned his coat, and I saw the gleam of a brace of pistols. I nodded, and, going to my trunk, opened it and showed him a couple of beautiful little pistols I often carried. Having loaded them, I put them in my side pockets. Shortly afterwards, eleven chimed, and getting into our cloaks, we left the house.
It was very cold, and a wintry wind moaned through the night. As we entered the park, we involuntarily kept closer together.
Somehow, my desire for adventure seemed to be ebbing away, and I wanted to get out from the place, and into the lighted streets.
“We’ll just have a look at the statue,” said Will; “then home and to bed.”
A few minutes later we reached a little clearing among the bushes.
“Here we are,” Will whispered. “I wish the moon would come out a moment; it would enable us to get a glance at the thing.” He peered into the gloom on our right. “I’m hanged,” he muttered, “if I can see it at all!”
Glancing to our left, I noticed that the path now led along the edge of a steep slope, at the bottom of which, some considerable distance below us, I caught the gleam of water.
“The park lake,” Will explained in answer to a short query on my part. “Beastly deep too!”
He turned away, and we both gazed into the dark gap among the bushes.

****************

 「武器はどうしようか?」やがて僕は訊いた。「念のために何かを携帯するのが賢明だと思うんだが?」
 答える代わりに、ウィルはコートのボタンを外して、鈍く光るピストルの柄を見せた。僕は頷いた。それから僕はトランクの方へ向かった。僕はトランクの蓋を開き、常々携帯している二挺の美しい拳銃を彼に見せた。それらに弾を込めると、僕はサイドポケットに忍ばせた。その直後に時計が十一時を告げ、それを合図に僕たちはコートに袖を通すと、家を出た。
 外はとても寒く、冬の風が夜の中で唸っていた。公園の入り口に辿り着いた時には、僕たちは知らず知らずのうちに互いに寄り添い合っていた。
 どうしたものだろうか、僕は次第に自分の冒険心が萎えて、この場所を離れて光のある大通りに戻りたくなっていた。
 「ちょっと像を見るだけだよ」とウィルは言った。「そしたら家に戻って寝よう」
 数分後、僕たちは繁みの向こうの少し空いた場所に辿り着いた。
 「ここにいることにしよう」とウィルは囁いた。「ちょっとでもいいから月が出ないかな。そうすればものがよく見えるようになるのに」彼は僕たちの右手にある暗がりを見詰めた。「吊るし上げてやる」と彼は呟いた。「一部始終を見ることが出来たらな」
 左手の方向をちらりと見た僕は、一本の小径があるのに気付いた。小径は急な坂道を描き、その行き着く先は僕たちの遥か下方で、僕はそこには水の煌く光を捉えた。
 「公園の池だよ」ウィルは僕のふとした疑問に答えて、説明してくれた。「恐ろしく深いんだ!」
 彼は顔を背けた。それから僕たちは二人とも、繁みの中に空いた黒い隙間からじっと公園を窺った。

"The Goddess of Death"
Written by William Hope Hodgson
(ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン)
Transrated by shigeyuki


goddess_1.jpg



The Goddess of Death


by William Hope Hodgson

 
 It was in the latter end of November when I reached T_____worth to find the little town almost in a panic. In answer to my half-jesting inquiry as to whether the French were attempting to land, I was told a harrowing tale of some restless statute that had a habit of running amuck among the worthy townspeople. Nearly a dozen had already fallen victims, the first having been pretty Sally Morgan, the town belle.
  These and other matters I learnt. Wherever I went it was the same story. “Good Heavens! what ignorance, what superstition!” This I thought, imagining that they were the dupes of some murderous rogue. Afterwards I was to change my mind. I gathered that the tragedies had all happened in some park near by, where, during the day, this Walking Marble rested innocently enough upon its pedestal.
 Though I scouted the story of the walking statue, I was greatly interested in the matter. Already it had come to me to look into it and show these benighted people how mistaken they had been; besides, the thing promised some excitement. As I strolled through the town I laughed, picturing to myself the absurdity of some people believing in a walking marble statute. Pooh! What fools there are! Arriving at my hotel, I was pleased to learn from my landlord that my old friend and schoolmate, William Turner, had been staying there for some time.
That evening while I was at dinner he burst into my room, and was delighted at seeing me.
 “I’ve suppose you’ve heard of the town bogey by now?” he said presently, dropping his voice. “It’s a dangerous enough bogey, and we’re all puzzled to explain how on earth it has escaped detection so long. Of course,” he went on,   “this story about the walking statue is all rubbish, though it’s surprising what a number of people believe it.”
 “What do you say to trying our hands at catching it?” I said. “There would be a little excitement, and we should be doing the town a public benefit.”
 Will smiled. “I’m game if you are, Herton―we could take a stroll in the park to-night, if you like; perhaps we might see something.”
 “Right,” I answered heartily. “What time do you propose going?”
 Will pulled out his watch. “It’s half-past eight now; shall we say eleven o’clock? It ought to be late enough then.”
 I assented and invited him to join me at my wine. He did so, and we passed the time away very pleasantly in reminiscences of old times.

****************

死の女神 


ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン 著

shigeyuki 訳


 僕がTという町に到着したのは十一月も終りの頃だった。そこは訪れるだけの価値のある小さな町だったが、恐怖が蔓延しつつあった。フランス人が上陸を試みているんじゃないか、という僕の軽口に対する答えとして、敬虔な町の人々の中を狂ったように駆け抜けてゆくという、徘徊する石像にまつわる痛ましい話の数々を聞かされた。既に一ダースもの犠牲者が出ていたが、その最初の犠牲者となったのは可憐なサリー・モーガンという女性で、町でも評判の美人だったということだった。
 僕が知り得たのはそれが全てだった。どこへ行っても同じ話を聞かされるのだ。「全く!何と無知で、何と迷信深いんだろう!」僕はそう思い、これはきっと人殺しの悪党どもの仕業にちがいないと考えた。後になって僕はその考えを改めることになる。僕は、この悲劇がすべて公園の近くで起こったものであること、また、日中はその公園でこの《歩く大理石象》は何食わぬ顔をしてきちんと台座の上にかしこまっているということなどを掴んだ。
 歩く石像の話を調べるうちに、僕はこの出来事に大いに興味を持った。既に僕の心の中には、この事件のことを調べて、町の人々がいかに無知であり、間違っているのかを白日の下に晒してやろうという考えが浮かんでいた。だが、それはさておいても、この出来事は興味深かった。町をぶらぶらと歩きながら僕は、歩く大理石の石像なんてものを信じている人々のことを愚かだと考えて、笑った。気の毒に!馬鹿ばっかりだな!宿に着いた時、僕は宿の主人から、僕の古い友人であり、学友でもあるウィリアム・ターナーがかねてからここに滞在しているということを聞かされ、嬉しく思った。
 その宵のこと、僕が夕食をとっている最中に彼が勢い良く部屋の中に飛び込んできて、僕との再会を喜んだ。
 「おい、そういえばお前は今この町を騒がしている正体不明の怪物についての話は聞いたか?」やがて彼は声を落として行った。「そいつはとても恐ろしいやつでね、俺たちはみんな、一体全体どうしてそいつがこんなにも長く捜索の手から逃れ続けることが出来るのか分からないんだ。もっとも」と彼は続けた、「歩く石像についての話は全く馬鹿げた戯言だが。でも驚いた事に、沢山の人たちが信じている」
 「君はもしかしたら、そいつを僕たちの手で捕まえようと言うつもりじゃないだろうね?」僕は言った。「それはちょっと血が騒ぐね。それに、僕たちも少しは公共のためになることをすべきだろうな」
 ウィルは微笑んだ。「そっちがその気なら、俺は乗るよ。お前さえよければ、今夜、公園を散歩してみないか。ひょっとしたら、何かを見ることが出来るかもしれない」
 「いいよ」と僕は力強く言った。「何時にしようか?」
 ウィルは懐中時計を取り出した。「今は八時半か。十一時にしないか?そのくらい遅い方がいいだろう」
 僕は同意し、それから彼をワインに誘った。彼は受け入れ、それから僕たちは昔の思い出に浸りながら、愉しい時間を過ごした。

"The Goddess of Death"
Written by William Hope Hodgson
(ウィリアム・ホープ・ホジスン)
Transrated by shigeyuki


 It was on the Friday night, that the Second Mate had the watch aloft looking for the man up the main; and for the next five days little else was talked about; though, with the exception of Williams, Tammy and myself, no one seemed to think of treating the matter seriously.         
 Perhaps I should not exclude Quoin, who still persisted, on every occasion, that there was a stowaway aboard. As for the Second Mate, I have very little doubt now, but that he was beginning to realise there was something deeper and less understandable than he had at first dreamed of. Yet, all the same, I know he had to keep his guesses and half-formed opinions pretty well to himself; for the Old Man and the First Mate chaffed him unmercifully about his "bogy".
 This, I got from Tammy, who had heard them both ragging him during the second dog-watch the following day. There was another thing Tammy told me, that showed how the Second Mate bothered about his inability to understand the mysterious appearance and disappearance of the man he had seen go aloft. He had made Tammy give him every detail he could remember about the figure we had seen by the log-reel. What is more, the Second had not even affected to treat the matter lightly, nor as a thing to be sneered at; but had listened seriously, and asked a great many questions. It is very evident to me that he was reaching out towards the only possible conclusion. Though, goodness knows, it was one that was impossible and improbable enough.
 It was on the Wednesday night, after the five days of talk I have mentioned, that there came, to me and to those who knew, another element of fear. And yet, I can quite understand that, at that time, those who had seen nothing, would find little to be afraid of, in all that I am going to tell you. Still, even they were much puzzled and astonished, and perhaps, after all, a little awed. There was so much in the affair that was inexplicable, and yet again such a lot that was natural and commonplace. For, when all is said and done, it was nothing more than the blowing adrift of one of the sails; yet accompanied by what were really significant details--significant, that is, in the light of that which Tammy and I and the Second Mate knew.



四、帆のいたずら
 
 二等航海士が、上にいる奴を捜してこいと、俺たちをマストに登らせたのは金曜の夜のことだったんだが、それから五日ほどの間は、他に話題に上ったことはほとんどなかった。ただ、ウィリアムス、タミー、それに俺の他は真面目に考えようともしてなかったがね。たぶんコインは除いておくべきだろうな。あいつはことあるごとにどっかに密航者がいるんだって執着し続けてたからな。二等航海士はといえば、初めに思ってたほど、理屈で説明のつくことはたいしてないと、もっと深い何かがあるんだと、気が付きかけてたんじゃないかな。とはいっても、推測もまとまりかけてた持論も、自分の中にしまいこんどかなけりゃならなかったんだ。というのも、船長と一等航海士とが奴さんの『お化け』を冷酷にもからかってたらしいんだ。タミーにきいた話なんだけどさ、翌日の第二折半直のときに、二人が冷やかしていたというんだ。それから、これもタミーからきいたことなんだが、二等航海士がマストの上にふっと現れ消えてしまった奴のことに、とまどい悩んでいたというような話はまだあるんだ。俺とタミーとがログリールの側に見た人影のことを思い出せる限りきいてきたんだそうだ。その上、軽くあしらうことも、せせら笑うこともなく真剣に聞いて、根掘り葉掘り質問してきたんだっていうんだぜ。奴さんが、ただ一つ可能な結論に手が届きつつあったのは間違いないんじゃないかな。それが、まったく不可能でありそうもないことだというのにさ。 
 水曜の夜のことだ。さっきの話しからは五日後で、それは俺と、他の恐怖の断片を知ってるやつらの身にも降り掛かってきた。はっきりいえるが、何も見なかった連中は、これから話そうと思ってることの中に、少なからず恐るべきものがあるってことにほとんど気づいていなかったはずだ。とはいえ、そんな奴らでも、ひどく驚き、困惑し、それにたぶん、少々の畏怖を感じてたろう。それは不可解な出来事ではあったが、一方ではごく単純で自然なことでもあったからだ。というのも、全てが終わってみれば、帆の一枚がはためいてただけ、ってことだったからな。しかし、それには本当に重要なことが隠れていたんだ。重要ってのは、俺とタミー、それに二等航海士が知っているようなことだ。

つづく

kane



上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。